Monday, October 17, 2011

From Shabby Eeeek to Mod



Shabby Eeeek or Shabby Chic               Mod Make-over


One thing I will need to admit is the fact that I can't resist a good art gallery, museum, flea market, yard sale or auction.  And one must not forget to mention the hidden treasures that are ready to be discovered in antique shops and thrift shops.  Important things I carry: anti-bacterial gel and magnifying lens, and a list of needed items.

Boy, was I thrilled when I ran across this old vanity swivel chair on "the FREE table" at a local shed sale.

Shabby Chic or Shabby Eeeek!

I admit, I peeked under the skirt.  And once I saw its sexy legs, I knew I was in love.  So home she came.  And off came her skirt.

Mid-Century

First I thought the original covering was vinyl.  My hopes were up!  It was fabric, though durable, there was staining and one button had popped through the fabric.  Not to mention, the swivel was broken.


Broken swivel? No worry.  Use a metal Lazy Susan

I remembered that I had a Lazy Susan swivel leftover from when my girls were small.  The intended use was so their doll house could rotate, but it really wasn't necessary.


Ta Da!  ( Lazy Susans cost about $9 )

The most challenging thing I found was removing the old swivel.  Here's what I did.  Use the broken swivel image and the Lazy Susan image above as a guide.
  1. Unscrew the mechanism from the seat base by removing visible screws that are attached to the base.
  2. When these screws are removed you can lift the legs and swivel.  Stand it up so the swivel is on top.
  3. Look at the swivel (or any lazy susan) there are large and small holes.
  4. Rotate the LARGE hole until you see a screw beneath it. 
  5. Remove that screw and rotate to where the others should be attached to the legs.
  6. Once all the screws are removed, reverse the procedure to attach the new swivel/Lazy Susan
Now it was time to "Make it Mine".  A friend had recently given me some leftover paint.  And the pink can was calling my name.


The leftover pink paint attacked a piece of wicker too!

Remembering a local fabric store (Hancock Fabrics).  I immediately went to their website and printed off a coupon with full intentions of buying new fabric for this chair.  Instead, I found that their upholstery vinyl was on clearance for $3 a yard!!   I then stopped by Home Depot to get some amo for my staple gun.

A designers gun and amo.

Guess what!  This was my 1st upholstery project!  I may not have the best technique, but here's what I did:
  1. Re-used the lining/cusion that came with the chair and stapled it down.
  2. Next center the chair seat on the underside of the vinyl upholstery fabric.
  3. Fold over and staple down 4 sections of the fabric. North, east, south & west.
  4. Starting nearest to each of these 1st four staples, gently pull & fold enough fabric to take a staple.
  5. One on each side of these 1st four staples. 
  6. Then firmly & gently pull, fold and staple the remaining space.
  7. Trim off the extra vinyl.

My finished project!



1 comment:

  1. That's great how you made that go from mid century to modern! I really like how you utilized the Lazy Susan! I will Definitely be back to see some more of your work.

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